Category Archives: breakfast

pancakes

200 g flour
30 g wheatgerm
30 g ground hazelnuts
(dry ingredients should total 2 cups)
2 tb raw sugar (this is mainly to help the pancake brown)
grated rind of 1 lime or lemon
1/4 tsp cardamom seeds, ground
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
pinch salt
480 ml / 2c milk
1 tb lemon juice
1 large egg
45 g unsalted butter, melted
oil for greasing the pan, ideally cocount

The texture of the pan you use is important. Non-stick surfaces give a bland uninteresting surface to the pancake. A textured surface, for example a Swedish ‘skeppschult’ sand-cast iron pan gives a more open surface and better overall browning.  Stainless steel can work well. Using two pans is essential if you are cooking for more than 3 people. Set the pan over the heat you will use when cooking the pancakes and allow the pan to warm up.

Combine dry ingredients. Mix lemon juice with the milk and stand 5 minutes. Whisk in the  egg and pour into a well in the dry ingredients and turn with a whisk, spread over melted butter, continue turning with the whisk until only just combined (there should still be lumps). Be sure to turn the mixture well as the batter will be wetter toward the bottom.

Grease the pan; it should be hot enough that the batter sizzles when laid in. This is not far off smoking point for the oil. Measure out 1/3 cup (60 ml) while tipping the pan to spread the batter out evenly. Cook until bubbles appear but and the edge appears brown  but top is still liquid, turn and cook briefly. If the pancake sticks, the problem is most likely your pan.

chickpeas on toast

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp carraway seeds
1 medium carrot, in 1cm dice
1 medium onion, in 1cm dice
30g chorizo sausage, finely diced
2 tsp tomato puree
120g tinned chickpeas, reserve water
200g tinned tomatoes
1 tsp caster sugar
Saute seeds in olive oil briefly, add carrot and onion and saute until soft. Add puree and sausage, cook a little more, add remaining ingredients + enough water so that total added liquid amounts to 220ml. Simmer covered for 20 mins. Remove lid and cook til nicely thickened.
Serve on thick toast and sprinkle with fresh coriander leaves.
Source: Ottolenghi in The Guardian

roast beef & variations

1,5 kg beef (minimum) blade chuck or top sirloin)
salt, pepper
mustard
olive oil

Take beef out of the fridge a couple of hours before cooking so that it can warm up to room temperature. Liberally salt, pepper and rub with generous amounts of mustard. Preheat oven to 80 degrees Celsius. Sear beef with olive oil in a heavy pan on very high heat on all sides. Sit on a roasting rack in a tray not much bigger than the beef. Slow roast until internal temperature reaches 55 degrees Celsius. (This takes approximately 30 mins for every 500 grs of meat.) Remove from oven, cover and let stand for 30 minutes.

Another recipe: Heston Blumenthal sears the beef with a blow torch and cooks it at an extremely low 55 degrees for about 20 hours.

With warm Belugal lentils
Cut cold beef into thin slices and serve on top of Warm Beluga Lentil Salad and drizzle with Austrian pumpkin seed oil.

Japanese
Very thinly slice cold roast beef and cut into strips. Place on top of a bowl of steaming hot Japanese sticky rice, this will warm the beef. Sprinkle with grated horseradish or wasabi. Drizzle with a Japanese sauce made of 50 ml mirin, 40 ml soya sauce, a grated 2 cm piece of ginger and a dash of lime or lemon juice.

Breakfast
Thin slices on toasted bread, with horseradish and fleur de sel.

breakfast like a king

“Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”
Adelle Davis, pioneering American nutritionist.

Not sure about her suggestion for dinner, but she is right about breakfast. Sunday brunch is nice – but we have a cooked breakfast nearly everyday, it is amazing how quick it is once you get the routine and hang of it. Keeps you going for most of the day!

pan con tomaca (Spain)

ciabatta, baguette or rye bread
3 ripe tomatoes, grated into a mush
clove of garlic
olive oil
fleur de sel

Halve bread sticks and cut in large pieces. Roast on a cast iron griddle, if necessary with a bit of olive oil. Rub with a clove of garlic, drizzle with olive oil. Spread liberally with tomato mush. Sprinkle with fleur de sel. Fresh thyme is also nice.

churros con chocolate (Spain)

OK, this is heavy and deep-frying in order to make breakfast is not for the faint-hearted, but this makes a great calorie-orgy on the occasional weekend.

250 grs medium white flour
250 ml water
1/4 tsp salt
rapeseed oil for frying

Bring water to a boil, lower heat, add flour and salt, mix vigorously with a wooden spoon to form a thick dough ball, remove from heat. Knead very well to avoid air being trapped in the dough. Press through a solid one-hand cake decorator with a large star-shaped tip into 10 cm long strips. Heat oil to 180 degrees in a pan, fry until golden brown. Drain on kitchen paper. For extra calories, roll in sugar.

WARNING: If the oil is too hot or you have air trapped in the dough, the churros may explode when being fried! a deep-fat frier with a built-in lid is safest.

Traditionally, churros are eaten dunked into Spanish hot chocolate. The “Reybar” brand is the very best if you can get your hands on it. Otherwise you can make some yourself:

120 grs good dark chocolate, chopped
2 cups full-fat milk
2 tbsp cornstarch
4 tbsp sugar
vanilla essence

Heat chocolate and half of the milk in a pan. Stir until the chocolate has melted. Dissolve the cornstarch in the remaining milk and whisk into the chocolate with the sugar and vanilla extract. Cook on low heat, whisking constantly, until the chocolate is thickened, about five minutes. Add extra cornstarch if it doesn’t start to thicken after 5 minutes, it is supposed to be nearly solid! Remove from heat and whisk smooth. Pour and server in wide cups or bowls for dunking churros.

Serve with freshly-pressed orange juice and plenty of water to balance the richness of the chocolate con churros.

frittata (Italy)

4 eggs
2 tomatoes, chopped
dash of milk
roasted red peppers in oil and/or caper-berries
grated parmesan
1 clove of garlic, minced
fresh herbs: thyme, rosemary or basil

Lightly whisk the eggs with the milk, add the remaining ingredients, mix well. Pour into a 20 cm heavy-bottomed non-stick pan and fry covered over very low heat, until set. Use a heat-spreader on a gas-hob if necessary. Cooking time is 20 minutes, no need to flip over. The bottom will be nicely browned. You can also bake it in the oven, in a baking tray, greased or lined with baking parchment – 180C, bottom heat, 20 mins. This is especially useful when making large portions.

You can add to the basic recipe of egg, tomato, cheese, garlic and herbs whatever ingredients you find in the fridge. Fresh vegetables should be cooked before. Feta cheese, roasted red peppers and Thai basil is a great combination.

Mediterranean fry up

merguez sausages or other spicy lamb sausages
thinly sliced fried haloumi cheese
fried tomatoes
roasted mushrooms sprinkled with thyme
green or red peppers roasted with garlic
eggs sunny side up

fried slices of saffron polenta, (great with an egg sunny side up)

fresh avocado, drizzled with olive oil and black pepper

Fry everything, serve with warm pita or other flat bread, hummus, baba ghanoush, or ful mudammas. Garnish with fresh thyme.

homemade yoghurt (Morocco)

yoghurt: UHT-full-fat milk and natural yoghurt as a starter
orange blossom water
honey
prunes or walnuts

Homemade yoghurt is the most delicious yoghurt you can get and it is easy to make. Mix 1 liter of UHT milk with half a cup of fresh natural yoghurt with live cultures. Keep for 8-10 hours in a yoghurt-maker or any other warm place, about 38 degrees. The longer you let it ripen, the more sour it will become. Let cool and then refrigerate. Mix with a dash or orange blossom water, chopped prunes or walnuts and sprinkle with honey.

smoked fish with poached egg (Scotland)

smoked fish filets: salmon, trout, haddock
ciabatta, baguette or rye bread
eggs, 1 for each person
fresh or curd cheese
caper-berries
dill (fresh, or frozen)

Roast the bread on a cast iron griddle. Spread with fresh or curd cheese, sprinkle with chopped caper-berries, a slice of fish, black pepper, dill and finally cover with an egg, either poached or sunny side up, salt with fleur de sel. Heaven.

porridge (Great Britain)

Porridge? Yes! You just need really good oats and a generous amount of salt and some nice topping:

1 part coarse or medium rolled oats
2 parts water
1/4 tsp salt

Bring water  and salt to a boil, add oatmeal, (mixing in a bit of rougher oatmeal makes for a heartier texture). If your porridge tends to stick and burn, prepare it in a bain-marie. If you prefer a softer porridge add more water.

Top with honey, freshly toasted chopped nuts or fresh fruit – ripe peaches are simply delicious.

Also great with apple slices, fried in butter together with a bit of sugar until slightly caramelized. Check out this page on the perfect porridge.

ham or roast beef with freshly grated horseradish (Austria)

Horseradish clears your head in the morning. Eat with some nice rye bread. Preserved, creamed horseradish also works as does a good mustard.

Recipe for home-made roast beef here.

scrambled eggs with fresh porcini mushrooms (Austria)

a good handfull of porcini mushrooms,
butter
eggs
dash of milk
salt

A delicacy for the short time of the year when you can get fresh porcini mushrooms. Cut the mushrooms into thin slices. Fry in butter until browned, salt. Lightly whisk eggs with milk, salt and pepper, add to the mushrooms in the pan. Don’t fry and scramble too long, the scrambled egg should still be quite moist. Sprinkle with black pepper & thyme. Also good with oyster mushrooms, fried with garlic.

fruit salad with mint

Cut various kinds of fruit in pieces, mix, sprinkle with lemon juice. Sweeten with honey if necessary and add chopped fresh mint. Some nuts, possibly roasted are also nice.

mango lassi

natural yoghurt
500 ml mango pulp (Alphonso variety)
250-500 ml water, according to taste
1 tbsp orange blossom or rose water

Mix all ingredients, sprinkle with ground cardamon and/or roast ground cumin and some toasted slivered almonds or pistachios. Garnish with mint.

Mike’s museli

1000 g rolled oats, medium size flakes, not big ones (standard packets of rolled oats porridge are fine)
120 ml peanut oil
200 g nuts (brazil/almonds/hazel) each cut into several pieces
100 g pine nuts
150 g sunflower seeds
100 g pumpkin seeds
100 g sesame seeds, lightly roasted, carefully, in a fry pan
60 g coconut thread
60 g ground linseeds (if available – whole linseeds are indegistible)
100 g oat bran
100 g wheat germ
150 g dried apricots cut into small pieces
100 g cake fruit mix or sultanas

Heat a large pan/dish on the stove and add half the oil. Add the rolled oats and stir briefly. Add the remainder of the oil and stir thoroughly. Put into the oven pre-heated to 380-400 degrees F and bake for about 10 mins. It should be hot to the touch but not turning brown.

Mix the nuts and seeds in a baking dish and bake these in the same oven for about 8 mins so that again they are hot but not turning brown.

Mix everything together. Serve with fresh fruit and trim milk.

Source: Dad

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